Alpha Lipoic Acid, also known as ALA, is a human dietary supplement used in the management of diabetes. While more toxic in cats, ALA can be dangerous if ingested by any pet.

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Signs and symptoms of toxicity: Toxicity may be seen within 30 minutes or it may take up to several hours to develop. Signs and symptoms of toxicity include low blood sugar, increased thirst and salivating, vomiting, difficulty walking, tremors, and seizures.

Toxic consumption: In cats the minimum toxic dose is 13 mg/kg (5.9 mg/lb). In dogs, 126 mg/kg (57 mg/lb) is considered the toxic threshold although fatal cases have been reported with ingestion of 100 mg/kg (45 mg/lb).

Dogs: ALA Toxic Consumption
X-Small
Yorkie, Chihuahua
Small
Pug, Boston Terrier, Poodle
Medium
Beagle, Scottish Terrier
Large
Boxer, Cocker Spaniel
X-Large
Retriever, German Shepherd
XX-Large
Great Dane, St. Bernard
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
26 – 40 lbs.
(11.8 – 18.2 kg)
41 – 70 lbs.
(18.6 – 31.8 kg)
71 – 90 lbs.
(32.3 – 40.9 kg)
91 – 110 lbs.
(41.4 – 50 kg)
dog1 dog2 dog3 dog4 dog7 dog6
> 45 mg > 500 mg > 1180 mg > 1860 mg > 3230 mg > 4140 mg

 

Cats: ALA Toxic Consumption
Most Cats

Large Cats
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
cat1 fat cat
> 5.8 mg > 65 mg

 
References:
– Osweiler, G, et al. (2011). Blackwell’s five-minute veterinary consult clinical companion. Small Animal Toxicology. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com