adderall

Accidental ingestion, and intoxication, of amphetamines is common in pets, particularly those in households with ADHD children. This drug classification includes both prescription medications and illegal drugs such as methamphetamine and ecstasy.

It is important to keep all medications out of your pets’ reach. It also recommended that you keep your pets medications away from those of the human family in order to prevent medication errors.

Signs and symptoms of toxicity: agitation, increased heart rate, panting, tremors, increased body temperature, and seizures. Signs may be seen within minutes or up to several hours following ingestion.

Toxic consumption: For dogs, the lethal oral dose ranges from 10-23 mg per kg of body weight.

Dogs: Amphetamines Toxic Consumption
X-Small
Yorkie, Chihuahua
Small
Pug, Boston Terrier, Poodle
Medium
Beagle, Scottish Terrier
Large
Boxer, Cocker Spaniel
X-Large
Retriever, German Shepherd
XX-Large
Great Dane, St. Bernard
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
26 – 40 lbs.
(11.8 – 18.2 kg)
41 – 70 lbs.
(18.6 – 31.8 kg)
71 – 90 lbs.
(32.3 – 40.9 kg)
91 – 110 lbs.
(41.4 – 50 kg)
dog1 dog2 dog3 dog4 dog7 dog6
> 4.5 mg > 50 mg > 118 mg > 186 mg > 323 mg > 414 mg

 
References:
– Osweiler, G, et al. (2011). Blackwell’s five-minute veterinary consult clinical companion. Small Animal Toxicology. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com
– Plumb DC. Plumb’s Veterinary Drug Handbook, 6th ed. Ames, IA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2008.
– image: http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Video/121018/tdy_college_adderall_121018.jpg