Generic Name: diltiazem
Brand Names: Cardiazem, Cardiazem CD, Cartia XT, Dilacor XR, Tiazac, Dilt-CD, Dilt-XR, Diltia XT

Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, is commonly used in human and veterinary medicine to treat many disease states including various cardiac diseases and renal complications. Despite its use in animals, accidental overdose of diltiazem can be dangerous for pets.

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Please note that other calcium channel blockers (such as amlodipine, verapamil, nefedipine, and felodipine) carry similar toxicity risks.

Signs and symptoms of toxicity: Signs of toxicity include vomiting, decreased heart rate, low blood pressure, altered mental status, diarrhea and weakness.

Toxic consumption:
In dogs, doses of 50 mg/kg may cause intoxication. There is no established toxic threshold for cats. All incidents of accidental exposure should be reported immediately.

Dogs: Diltiazem Toxic Consumption
X-Small
Yorkie, Chihuahua
Small
Pug, Boston Terrier, Poodle
Medium
Beagle, Scottish Terrier
Large
Boxer, Cocker Spaniel
X-Large
Labrador & Golden Retrievers, German Shepherd
XX-Large
Great Dane, St. Bernard
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
26 – 40 lbs.
(11.8 – 18.2 kg)
41 – 70 lbs.
(18.6 – 31.8 kg)
71 – 90 lbs.
(32.3 – 40.9 kg)
91 – 110 lbs.
(41.4 – 50 kg)
dog1 dog2 dog3 dog4 dog7 dog6
> 22 mg > 249 mg > 589 mg > 929 mg > 1614 mg > 2069 mg

 

References:
– Costello M, Syring RS. Calcium channel blocker toxicity. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2008; 18:54-60.
– Osweiler, G, et al. (2011). Blackwell’s five-minute veterinary consult clinical companion. Small Animal Toxicology. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com