Ethylene glycol is commonly found in automobile anti-freeze and refrigerant liquid. While methanol and propylene glycol may also be found in anti-freeze solutions, ethylene glycol is considered the most toxic if ingested by animals.

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There is speculation that the sweet taste of ethylene glycol entices animals to ingest this product. It is, therefore, extremely important that all product spills be cleaned up immediately.

Signs and symptoms of toxicity: Vomiting often occurs within the first few hours post-ingestion. Other clinical signs of toxicity include depression, difficulty walking, weakness, rapid breathing, increased urination and increased thirst. Acute renal failure may occur 18-36 hours post-ingestion.

Toxic consumption:
In dogs, 4.4 – 6.6 mL/kg (2 – 3 mL/lb) of ethylene glycol may be toxic, even fatal. In cats the toxic threshold is 1.4 mL/kg (0.6 mL/lb).

Dogs: Ethylene Glycol Toxic Consumption
X-Small
Yorkie, Chihuahua
Small
Pug, Boston Terrier, Poodle
Medium
Beagle, Scottish Terrier
Large
Boxer, Cocker Spaniel
X-Large
Retriever, German Shepherd
XX-Large
Great Dane, St. Bernard
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
26 – 40 lbs.
(11.8 – 18.2 kg)
41 – 70 lbs.
(18.6 – 31.8 kg)
71 – 90 lbs.
(32.3 – 40.9 kg)
91 – 110 lbs.
(41.4 – 50 kg)
dog1 dog2 dog3 dog4 dog7 dog6
> 1.9 mL > 21 mL > 51 mL > 81 mL > 142 mL > 182 mL

 

Cats: Ethylene Glycol Toxic Consumption
Most Cats

Large Cats
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
cat1 fat cat
> 0.6 mL > 6.9 mL

 

References:
Osweiler, G, et al. (2011). Blackwell’s five-minute veterinary consult clinical companion. Small Animal Toxicology. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com