lead paint

Exposure to lead can be quite toxic to pets. Lead paint or lead-contaminated dust or soil are the most common sources of lead poisoning in dogs and cats. Owners should be cautious of older, non renovated buildings were lead-based paint may have been used.

Other household sources of lead poisoning include car batteries, linoleum, plumbing materials, lubricating compounds, putty, tar paper, lead foil, golf balls, pencils, and fishing supplies.

Signs and symptoms of toxicity: vomiting, diarrhea, refusal to eat, weight loss, abdominal pain, extreme fatigue, increased thirst, increased urination, and seizures.

Toxic consumption: The toxicity threshold in cats is not well defined. In dogs, the toxicity is dependent on the lead form. Ingestion of 190 mg/kg has been shown to cause acute toxicosis.

Dogs: Lead Toxic Consumption
X-Small
Yorkie, Chihuahua
Small
Pug, Boston Terrier, Poodle
Medium
Beagle, Scottish Terrier
Large
Boxer, Cocker Spaniel
X-Large
Retriever, German Shepherd
XX-Large
Great Dane, St. Bernard
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
26 – 40 lbs.
(11.8 – 18.2 kg)
41 – 70 lbs.
(18.6 – 31.8 kg)
71 – 90 lbs.
(32.3 – 40.9 kg)
91 – 110 lbs.
(41.4 – 50 kg)
dog1 dog2 dog3 dog4 dog7 dog6
> 85 mg > 950 mg > 2242 mg > 3534 mg > 6137 mg > 7866 mg

 

References:
– Morgan, RV. Lead poisoning in small companion animals: an update (1987 – 1992). Vet Hum Toxicol 1994;36:18-22.
– Osweiler, G, et al. (2011). Blackwell’s five-minute veterinary consult clinical companion. Small Animal Toxicology. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com
– VanAlstine WG, Wickliffe LW, Everson RJ, et al. Acute lead toxicosis in a household of cats. J Vet Diagn Invest 1993;5:496-498