Propylene glycol is found in many household products and has a significant toxic risk if ingested by pets. Of note, it is commonly found in ‘pet-safe’ anti-freeze products. While this form of anti-freeze is less toxic than those containing ethylene glycol, these products still pose a risk to pets if ingested.

Propylene glycol can also be found in RV antifreeze, hair dyes, disinfectants, paints and varnishes.

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Signs and symptoms of toxicity: Initial signs of toxicity include depression, weakness, involuntary muscle movements, increased urination, and increased thirst. Low blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse, and seizures can also occur. There is a risk of lactic acidosis and Heinz body anemia (in cats) developing later.

Toxic consumption: In dogs, 9 mL/kg (4.1 mL/lb) can be fatal. There is no established toxic threshold in cats. All incidents of accidental consumption should be reported.

Dogs: Elemental Iron Toxic Consumption
X-Small
Yorkie, Chihuahua
Small
Pug, Boston Terrier, Poodle
Medium
Beagle, Scottish Terrier
Large
Boxer, Cocker Spaniel
X-Large
Retriever, German Shepherd
XX-Large
Great Dane, St. Bernard
1 – 10 lbs.
(0.45 – 4.6 kg)
11 – 25 lbs.
(5 – 11.4 kg)
26 – 40 lbs.
(11.8 – 18.2 kg)
41 – 70 lbs.
(18.6 – 31.8 kg)
71 – 90 lbs.
(32.3 – 40.9 kg)
91 – 110 lbs.
(41.4 – 50 kg)
dog1 dog2 dog3 dog4 dog7 dog6
> 4 mL > 44 mL > 106 mL > 167 mL > 290 mL > 372 mL

 

References:
Osweiler, G, et al. (2011). Blackwell’s five-minute veterinary consult clinical companion. Small Animal Toxicoloty. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com